Category: homesteading

Male blooms vs. female blooms on the Armenian Cucumber plants….

Male blooms vs. female blooms on the Armenian Cucumber plants. You can see the female bloom has a cucumber like bulb at its base, this will be the part that turns into the fruit. Like all squash and melon plants they require pollinators to transfer the pollen from the stamen of male flower to the pistil of the female flower. In it’s adolescent phase the cucumber plant often produce a bunch of male flowers with little to no female flowers, this is completely normal so focus on it’s leaves and watching to make sure they are a healthy green color with no signs of pests or fungus. Eventually the plant will balance out with male and female blooms.

My Sweet Million Tomato clones are thriving! So exciting to…

My Sweet Million Tomato clones are thriving! So exciting to start with 2 plants and end up with 10! See my earlier post about how to collect suckers from your tomato plants to more than double your crop, no need to buy seeds or starts when you can do it for free yourself!

Some now and thens of a couple of my crops, now pictures take…

Some now and thens of a couple of my crops, now pictures take July 7th. Then pictures: Russet Potatoes- June 7th Brussle Sprout- May 27th Bouquet Dill- May 03rd
The potatoes I started with Russets left too long from the grocery store and they seem to be doing really well.
I am battling Cabbage White Butterfly larave aka caterpillars on my Brussle sprout, I’ve been able to keep them from completely destroying my crop but the damage is constant and I hope I can at least keep them at bay long enough to get a harvest.
My dill has quite an ecosystem happening on it and I’ve decided not to fight it and let nature do its thing, its been pretty interesting watching the cycle of carnivorous bugs visit to feast on the aphids and caterpillars. My good bugs have included spiders, lady bugs and lacewings!

Successfully rooted daughter plants from my Strawberries, I now…

Successfully rooted daughter plants from my Strawberries, I now have 8 new plants for a total of 12 all together, my “mother plants are still producing fruit! It is rewarding to more than double your crop with out being a victim of the dollar.

After your Cilantro bolts and flowers, you can let it re-seed…

After your Cilantro bolts and flowers, you can let it re-seed itself and come back next year, or you can save the Coriander seeds and use it as spice in the kitchen. Plants are amazing.

Remember those tomato suckers I pulled off of my mature Sweet…

Remember those tomato suckers I pulled off of my mature Sweet Million plant? Well they successfully root and I ended up with 11 more plants! I gave 3 away and today I put my two larger ones into containers and my 6 smaller into the ground. I have never grown tomatoes in the ground so it will be interesting to see how they turn out! I never found them wilty in the process of rooting them and I was happy to find lots of healthy roots on all of them.

Remember those seed potatoes I planted back at the beginning of…

Remember those seed potatoes I planted back at the beginning of May? So far two have sprouted! As they grow i will “hill” them by adding dirt to the container. Excited to see how it goes!

Today I set up some pots with dry soil in it to attempt to let…

Today I set up some pots with dry soil in it to attempt to let some of my strawberry runners root. If they were in the ground they would spread like a ground cover would. Once it has roots the “daughter” plant can be cut from the “mother” plant giving you an entirely new plant. The white powder you see is diatemacious earth, an organic insecticide that works really well. I want to keep ants and other bugs off of my ripening strawberries.

Remember that Cabbage White butterfly I told you about? After…

Remember that Cabbage White butterfly I told you about? After seeing them visiting my container garden I started checking for eggs. Today I removed by hand roughly 100 eggs from my 3 cabbage crops. I used tweezers and just gently scooped the eggs off of each leaf being careful not to drop them back into the container.

The Pieris rapae or Cabbage White butterfly is native to North…

The Pieris rapae or Cabbage White butterfly is native to North America and range all the way from Canada to Central America. It is a pollinator, so that’s good but it lays its eggs on Brassicaceae plants (broccoli, Brussle sprout, cabbage…) So that’s bad. Either plant enough for people and caterpillars to enjoy or you can net your plants or with a small enough crop monitor it and remove eggs or caterpillars found on the underside of the leaves of your plant.